The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) by Frederica  Hall

The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)


The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)


When the story of its poisoning by DDT was popularized in Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, a nascent environmental movement rallied around it: the great raptor was one of the first species listed under the 1967 precursor to today’s Endangered Species Act. The bald eagle’s comeback has been a testament to the power of the Endangered Species Act. Leading up to the delisting of the eagle on  2007. Yet there are only 39 breeding pairs in Arizona, nesting primarily along the Verde, Salt, and Gila rivers. While on the national level bald eagles have made a remarkable recovery, in the Southwest they still suffer from high mortality and low reproductive rates and depend on precious, rapidly disappearing riparian habitat. For these reasons, the Center for Biological Diversity has called for the desert nesting bald eagle to continue to be managed separately and remain on the endangered species list. We're working to protect Arizona’s Verde River, one of the most endangered rivers in the nation and the best remaining habitat for Arizona eagles.